Saturday, February 09, 2019

Introducing: Yagi, the 2006 Yamaha TW200 and a Scarlett Update

Yagi: Japanese for Goat.

The Yamaha TW200 Dual Sport Motorcycles have apparently garnered a reputation for go-anywhere little motorcycles, not very fast (in fact I think a Ural is faster if you can believe that!), good reliability and easy to service.


So the name Yagi pretty much came to mind after some debate.

I'm thinking Yagi will allow me to continue riding those back trails and forest roads I so like to explore and perhaps even summit some of the mountain passes that have defeated my Urals in the past.



She's a 2006, and I'm the third owner.  She comes to me with about 7300 miles on her.  The original speedometer failed at 7266 and the second one may have to be replaced.  I started maintenance tracking assuming a mileage of 7500 miles.


Had to replace the left mirror mount (broken by PO's nephew when he dropped the motorcycle), have a new speedometer but the second one started working on my way home the day I purchased it.  Have mostly finished the 7000 mile services on it in order to familiarize myself with the maintenance operations and so far, pretty simple!

I added the hand guards and storage case, a voltmeter, cheap tachometer and tank bag.

On today's riding, had to switch to reserve at 98 miles.  Filled up with 1.4 gallons so MPG (roughly) is 71 MPG?
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Scarlett, my 2014 Ural Patrol sits with the gearbox out along with all the parts involved with removing said gearbox from the frame.  She needs a completely new clutch and associated hardware and the gearbox input shaft has to be replaced.  Sadness.  She most likely will go to the dealer in Loveland, CO soon to be repaired there and at IMWA (the gearbox) and then sold on consignment basis.

 The gearbox's input shaft's splines, pretty chewed up

Like the last time the clutch plates needed replacement,
 it's like someone used a lathe and grounded off
the splines that mate to the input shaft splines in the first pic.


27 comments:

Andrew Thomson said...

Nice one! The little Yammie should be reliable alright. Currently looking at little trailees myself...

dom chang said...

It sure would be nice to not worry about dying out on some trail.... ;)

Diamond Dave said...

That little Yam will positively SIP gasoline too.

dom chang said...

Diamond Dave, yep, should get upwards of 60 mpg....perhaps more.

RichardM said...

Nice. So, when is the first RV trip? After being home for a couple of weeks you must be getting cabin fever...

dom chang said...

Thanks RichardM and yes, I am already getting cabin fever....unsure of when I'll leave next....perhaps headed South and East this time.

Troubadour said...

Congratulations! Welcome to the T-Dub Club! Looking forward to write ups and posts of your new adventures.

dom chang said...

Thanks Troubadour....looking forward to some off-pavement riding, especially once I figure out how much to air down the tires. Apparently, this helps a lot.

Bob and Sharon said...

Nice ride. I think the biggest problem is going to be packing your necessities. If you lower the air you'll need a pump to get it back, But I don't imagine you'll stray to far from your RV. Again nice ride.

Trobairitz said...

Congrats Dom. These are great little bikes. I love tootling around on my TDub. And yes, airing down the tires helps when in mountain goat mode or in sand.

Spat said...

Congrats on the new ride have fun with it, I like go anywhere bikes. Too bad we sold our DR's this past fall would have been fun 2 wheel'n along with ya. Don't fret too much about airing down tires,I know it's not a street bike but if you do then your airing back up. I alway stayed on the low side of factory suggested preasure and hook up always worked good. Go down too much and you could spin the tire loose from the rim.
Looking forward to the new endevors

dom chang said...

Thanks Bob, I plan to carry a small air pump for such times....we’ll see how that goes.

dom chang said...

Thanks Trobairitz

dom chang said...

Thanks Spat, the airing down concept is new to me so we’ll see how that goes....I expressed the concern to present t-dub riders and the consensus I’m seeing is there’s so little HP (16) that the chances of spinning the tire loose are slim? That said, I will try small decrements to see what works for me.

Troubadour said...

I believe the manufacturer's recommended tire pressure is 18psi, and the TDub has such fat tires that you shouldn't have to air down too much, however if you get into a situation where you want to air down you'd probably be safe down to 12psi, (maybe 10psi). A word of caution though, the TW doesn't have rim locks, so if you drop the pressure too low you risk spinning a tire and tearing out a valve stem.

Something else to consider is fuel, the tank is small so I'm considering mounting a Rotopax fuel can to the rear rack.

SonjaM said...

Love the TW 200, always been a fan of this bike, which was never sold in Germany. I am sure the goat will get you where the Ural didn't. A great companion for Uma. Keeping fingers crossed with regards to Scarlett's future.

Philip and Sharon said...

Thank you for sharing your adventures. As bloggers we know how much work it can be. Please keep publishing if you have the energy. It is very much appreciated.

Coop a.k.a. Coopdway said...

You know I approve...I love mine! My '92 still had the kickstarter. I put a larger Clarke gas tank on and a couple of Trailways racks for my throwover saddle bags. I still have the Kolpin gas tank but seldom carry it these days.

PO had run into a tree and squashed my speedo turning the sheet metal frame inside from a rectangle into a trapazoid which pushed the frame right against the magnetic needle wheel. As a result, I have one of the very few speedometers in the world that reads far less than actual (the odometer is right on). I always have a GPS unit on but to be sure, I use a calibrated bicycle speedometer, primarily for its trip meter which my old version did not have.

When shopping for mine, there were only a handful of them reasonably available. The price of mine and its small Cobra windshield are the things that put this one at the top of my list.

Have fun Dom!!

dom chang said...

Thanks Coop, you reminded me re putting on the Kolpin upright bracket to the rear of the rack, held there by the storage case and some 185lb Tensile strength metal zip ties for now. I'll get beefier mounts if I like that weight back there.

dom chang said...

Yes Troubadour, 18 PSI at my weight range....consensus seems to be no lower than 10-12 as you advise.....

dom chang said...

Yours and Coop’s comments resulted in my just securing a Kolpin upright stand to rear of cargo rack.

dom chang said...

Thanks SonjaM for the info, wonder why it did not get sold in Germany? As to Scarlett, it’s not looking great right now.

dom chang said...

You’re welcome Phil and Sharon....we’ll see what the future portends....

Steve Williams said...

That Yamaha seems like a mule. Slow, steady and reliable. Who needs speed when you're crawling up a mountain. I have looked hard at these motorcycles along with the Honda CRF250L. Something small and light to tour the central Pennsylvania landscape and take on some things that the Vespa struggles with.

I'll be watching closely. Don't mess this up!

dom chang said...

That’s what I’m hoping it’ll help me do Steve....some training is in my future as well.

Anonymous said...

Eu sou realmente impressionado com suas habilidades de escrita e também com o layout de seu weblog.
Este é um tema pago ou você personalizar é você mesmo?
Qualquer forma acompanhar o excelente escrevendo com qualidade, tem raro ver um bom blog como este
estes dias .

dom chang said...

obrigado anônimo, não é um tema pago, apenas um modelo mais antigo que eu personalizei um pouco.