Sunday, July 13, 2014

Lightening my Camping Load

Last year's ride to Alaska and back highlighted to me that the equipment I schlep along for camping is too big and heavy.

I will be sticking with the two man tent that I have, for now, as I like to bring in my riding gear and assorted stuff at night.  It works, it's waterproof so long as I keep up on the waterproofing sprays.

The stove I took was a two-burner stove from Coleman.  Worked great but bulky and heavy.

src: google

Recently I found (while purging closets) the old field stove I had used while in the Army.  Its a Scorpion brand stove that uses butane canisters for fuel:

A similar stove
src: advrider.com

However, the fuel canister I had stored with it was depleted, no big surprise as its been over 20 years since I used it.  The propane fuel bottles I have in stock weren't usable of course due to the connection.  However, as butane doesn't work as well in colder temps and such, I decided to find an adapter that would allow me the use of the more ubiquitous propane bottles rather than stocking up on butane canisters:

src: campsaver.com

The above is the Kovea LPG Adapter and it cost me $26 through amazon.  As you can see in the pic above, it has male connectors on each end, one for propane bottles and one for butane canisters.  You set the flow screw to a bit above fully closed to handle the higher pressure from the propane fuel bottle and you're good to go!  Tested it the other day, works fine.

example pic showing use of regular propane bottle, kovea adapter and a small
stove similar to the one I use.
src: LINK

Yes, am aware of multi-fuel stoves but also have been told that the ones that burn gasoline also tend to add a "gas" taste to food cooked with it?  I don't know and besides, the propane bottles I plan to use can be had most anywhere.

Another item that was bulky and somewhat heavy, was the folding camp chair I sometimes take along when camping.  This was replaced by an item which weighs much less and stores quick compact, the Coleman Camp Stool:

Coleman Camp Stool: $14

The above will also come in handy as a stool to sit on while working on the motorcycle while on the road; it is just the right height for me to use it instead of kneeling while doing repairs and maintenance.  Dimensions when folder: 10.2 in. x 8.4 in. x 1.6 in. (26 cm x 21 cm x 4 cm)

The old Army sleeping bag, which is rated for -10F, I'll keep though it is a bit bulky, just need to get a better waterproof bag for it.  It doesn't weigh much, with is the more overriding concern for me when camping.  

All for now, we'll see how things go as I hope to go camping now and then this Summer and Fall.

5 comments:

SonjaM said...

And I wish for you that you will have the time and opportunity to go camping!!!

Richard M said...

Motorcycle camping is more similar to bicycle camping than car camping as weight and volume really do matter. Unlike backpacking, you rarely need to carry multiple days of food and water. I like butane for short trips but still prefer liquid fuel (gas) for long trips due to the much higher energy per unit weight or volume. Nice option to use propane cylinders instead of butane.

Martha said...

Reviewing the weight and flexibility of camping gear, knowing you have a new job that lets you work anywhere there is wi fi. Are you trying to tell us something? Haha...I am curious to learn where you are going with all of this?

Xoxo
Wifey

Trobairitz said...

It is amazing how much we downsize when moto camping. Good thing they make small sizes of most every type of equipment for back packers

RichardM said...

"Haha...I am curious to learn where you are going with all of this?"

Hmmm, now this is getting more interesting...